• Down 1 in 4H. N’s double is clearly for takeout as I learned the criteria: the bidding level is below game; neither I nor partner has made a call other than “pass”; the double is of a suit bid. There is also the fact that while N, lacking Spade support, may not have had a hand that qualified for a double over 1C, once opponents bid Spades N’s…

  • 4H is a reasonable bid if S opens 1H and N jumps the bidding. That contract actually should not make, but computers are poor defenders, it seems. Anyway, I hesitated about opening, but decided that 2 quick tricks and both majors, including solid Hearts, deserved a shot. Started with the “book” 1S bid, ended at a very reasonable 3H, and made…

  • Something seriously wrong, here. (Yes, made 11 tricks in Hearts, but good defenders would have held me to 9. Explaining the defensive reasoning is for another time.) I cannot believe that a human West, looking at that good 7-card Spade suit, would not have mentioned it. West knows that the Diamonds are at most 7 cards (6 for partner’s weak 2…

  • Simple decision for me. I never leave partner in NT with a void unless going to the next level would be certifiably insane. (And even then!) The danger of the unstopped suit is bad enough, but it pales in comparison with the communication problems! In this case, making 3 NT is sheer luck, with opponents having 5 tricks off the top.

  • Led low Diamond; down 3. Rules I was taught on leads: top of two; top of 3 headed by 9 or worse (some nowadays like MUD from 3 without an honor – Middle, Up, Down – but I find it confusing); low from 3 headed by an honor and 4th best from four or more except when your three or four are headed by an honor sequence. Against a suit contract, you need…

  • First, with a balanced hand and 15-17 HCP, I almost always open 1 NT. The exception is on 5-3-3-2 distribution, when I have 17 gilt (i.e., mostly A’s and K’s) HCP and a good Spade 5-carder, in which case a 1S opening generally works better. Here the 1NT got us to the right place fast.
    When Dummy came down after W’s Spade lead I had 10…

  • Whatever happened to the notion that responder’s first duty after a takeout double was to let opener know whose side the hand belonged to by redoubling with 10 HCP or better? I thought that was virtually the law of the land – who repealed it? Notice how it solved a lot of bidding problems for me, identifying the importance of my double Spade stop…

  • To whoever thought a response of 1D somehow denies a 4-card major – huh? What bridge book did you find that notion in? South properly responds 1D because it is his longest suit! If partner has a biddable major the rebid will show it. Meanwhile, though, W’s 1H overcall warns N-S away from that suit – even if partner had 4-card support for your…

  • Double was out of the question, in at least Standard American! There are certain well-known lead-directing conventions involved in doubling on this bidding. Without getting too detailed, a double of 3NT by South here would have forbidden the lead of a Spade and strongly suggested – almost demanded – the lead of a Club. Since S wants a Spade lead…

  • Puzzled by N’s pass. Isn’t a second-round jump by responder always a game force, even when it is jump support for opener’s first suit? (If you are playing 4th suit forcing, it might be invitational, but this program doesn’t play that.) Made 4H; what a waste!

  • Graeme’s point about points is of course correct, but he started with a little lecture about scoring, which ironically led me to bid game. After all, once I was in 3H, what was I risking by going on? Assuming 3H makes, that is 90; if it goes down 1, that is -50. If I make 4 on a 3H bid, that is just another 30 points – but I am kicking myself…

  • Held E-W to one overtrick. Ever since the invention of the takeout double it has been almost an unbreakable bridge law that partner in the passout seat must reopen the bidding rather than ever let the opponents play at one of a suit. South could be lurking behind opener with 15 points and 5 or 6 trumps, just waiting for a chance to close the jaws…

  • @rdp27 – You had two bidding problems no one seems to be helping you with, so let me try. First, when opening a minor suit with equal length in both minors, bid 1 Diamond. This allows you to respond 2 Clubs over any 1-level bid, and partner can pass your Clubs or support your diamonds without increasing the level of the contract. This way you had…

  • Down 1 doubled – a good result. Fail to understand how any N-S pair ended plus when defending a Spade contract. E-W are cold for 4 Spades; only computers could contrive to go down with these cards!
    Again a Law of Total Tricks hand. There are 18 total trumps (19 if you count Clubs instead of Spades), and 19 total tricks – probably…

  • Comments on the bidding:
    1. N does not have an opening bid, Rule of 20 notwithstanding. You cannot count unguarded honors (except the Ace) at their full HCP value; e.g., the stiff QJ is worth at best 2 points, and the Rule of 20 count at best is thus 19.
    2. What about other hand evaluation methods? Even at the most generous count, North is…

  • Standard third-hand opening, maybe a little stronger given that the 11 HCP consisted of 2-1/2 quick tricks.

  • 4H is always down against intelligent defense. (E takes Club A-K while W plays high-low; Club ruff, Diamond A give defense 4 tricks.) Set 4D one trick, doubled (per Law of Total Trumps).

  • Made 6S. However, no credit to me! The credit goes entirely to East. At trick 2 the merest glance at Dummy begs for a Club return; East’s actual continuation of Diamonds is indefensible to the point of irresponsible – even for a computer! If E returns a Club, the contract is held to 10 tricks. But should 4S be bid? IMO yes; the bidding suggests…

  • Opened with 1H. I have found that on freak hands like this with few HCPs, it is best to consider obstructive as well as constructive tactics. Many factors need to be considered. In this case, I had 2 quick tricks, two 5-carders (one a major) with good intermediates, and a void. At the very least a 1H opening would be lead-directing. As it turned…

  • Played the hand twice. 1st time the bidding went N-P, E-1S, me-dbl, W-2S, N-dbl, followed by 3 passes. Since the computers don’t play responsive doubles, N’s double should have been for business and for that, he should have had a minimum of 4 trumps. (I can’t have more than 2 based on my takeout double.) 2Sx made, for a dreadful score. N’s proper…

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